Why I Vote

The following is written by Paul Barudin, League Intern.

Possibly our first really important influence as to why we vote is our parents. From an early age they teach us about our life, how to live it, and how to shape it into what we will ultimately be living in. From learning to drive, to making food, to voting, our parents help us to define who we are, what we think and more importantly, why we think those things, even if we happen to disagree. Guy Barudin is my father as well as a managing director of Terrapin Partners, LLC and a portfolio manager at Terrapin Asset Management, LLC.

We keep in frequent touch and talk often. I asked him if he wouldn’t mind answering a few of my questions, especially with November 4th on the horizon, I thought I would try to get his insight as to his thoughts and perspectives about the vote.

Guy BarudinWhen was the most recent time you exercised you’re right to vote?
Personally, I voted in the last presidential election in 2012 and in a couple of local NJ elections since then. I didn’t vote in the 2014 primaries but expect to vote this November.

When you cast a vote, what does it feel like to you?
When I walk into a voting booth physically or mark an absentee ballot, I remember my parents and all the people I know who served in the armed forces. I think of all the challenges people have around the world simply trying to vote in countries wracked by war. I’m proud to be able to vote. I get a little emotional.

When you were registered to vote (for the first time) do you remember what it felt like?
Actually, I don’t remember – it was a long time ago – but it wasn’t long after the Vietnam War ended for the US and I had to fill out some draft papers at the same time. It was a little scary, but also felt like the first “grown up” thing I’d done.

Are you more likely to vote in certain kinds of elections (local, statewide, national, referendums)?
I’m definitely more likely to vote in a local election where there is an issue I find important, and for congress and senate elections. If I think that a competent person is running and they aren’t being challenged by a dummy, I’m less likely to vote.

Do you think it’s important for people to vote? Explain why.
The very nature of our towns, our counties, our states, and our country, relies on people being knowledgeable about facts and giving voice to their opinions in ways that effect leadership. This means taking time to go to meetings, to stay informed about current events. It means maybe even to serve on committees or hold office on everything ranging from local school and town groups all the way up to groups involved in national or international issues. It’s about taking an active role in our lives, not just sitting back and going along for the ride. Our votes are one way we participate in our public lives. In the US, we have the right to vote because of great things previous generations did. We should vote to have a voice in our own lives and to honor our history and the sacrifices made by Americans who came before us.

Do you see your vote impacting your community?
Yes – absolutely. School board elections and town council elections have direct effect on the quality of our streets and towns. State and county elections lead to the management of things as tangible as road improvement and park services, school curriculum, local taxes. To not vote is to put control of our lives into the hands of other people with whom we may or may not agree.

When voting season comes around, do you ask friends and family if they’re going to vote as well, or do you keep it to yourself?
I’m a nag – I remind people they should vote. I remind them they can request absentee or advance ballots if they aren’t sure they can get to the polls physically. Probably my friends and family think I’m annoying.

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