Voting: A Family Affair

The following blog post is written by Jasmine Boddie, LWVNJ intern.

Boddie FamilyIt was Election Day of 2012 at 6:00 am in the Boddie household. I was peacefully asleep when the sound of a knock on my door echoed throughout my room. All I heard next was my mother’s voice stating, “It’s time to go vote.” I sprang out of bed as fast as possible and flew downstairs ready to go. Already waiting was my father and older sister Brittany. Of course the youngest of the bunch, Cortnee was the last one ready. Finally, we were ready to go to the polls. The five of us plus our dog Fancie walked down the street toward the fire station, our polling place. We each placed our votes. However, Cortnee could not because she wasn’t of age yet. This was the first time I was able to vote since I had turned 18. Now in the year 2014 we are all eligible to vote.

My family and I were extremely excited about this election. So, my mother had an idea that we should all go to NYC to watch the voting results. We all bundled up tight and went to MSNBC studios to watch. We got to take pictures wearing all types of gear in red, white and blue. After, the election was decided the streets of NYC exploded with excitement. There were huge screens everywhere with the President’s picture on it. At around this time we were ready to head back home because we were frost bitten by then.

Voting in my family has always been a family affair. From a very young age my sisters and I were exposed to the world of politics. The news and political debates were constantly on television in our house. Many people in my community do not vote at all. They feel as though one vote won’t change anything or make a difference. However, if everyone has that mentality, that one vote that wasn’t cast turns into hundreds of votes.

I vote not only for myself but for the African American community as well. We weren’t always given the right to vote in our history. I tip my hat to those individuals that have come before me and fought for the privilege that many take for granted. I vote for the women that have passed on that were never given the opportunity to express their political views. I will make sure to keep my families voting traditions alive when I pass them on to my children. This way we will have instilled in generation after generation the importance of voting.

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